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How to Identify Ticks

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There are hundreds of species of ticks, which are small brown or black insects in the same class as spiders and other 8-legged pests. Most of this species are hardly bigger than a pin head or a poppy seed, and they feed entirely on blood to grow. They latch on to animals like deer, mice, rats, squirrels, birds, dogs, cats, and humans.

Each of a tick’s life stages includes gorging on blood. Once the adult tick reaches its final stage, it climbs on blades of grass, leaves, or other vegetation and extends its two front legs in a method known as questing. When the right host comes in contact with them, the tiny hooks on their front legs latch on, and then they find a spot to make a hole in the skin and start to feed.

Most ticks exist outdoors on logs, grass, wood, and even beaches. They prefer warm, moist areas of a body. When a tick gets on a human’s body, it’s likely to migrate to the armpits, groin, or hair. Once they’re in a suitable spot, they bite into the skin and begin to draw blood. Unlike most other bugs that bite, they typically remain attached to their host after they bite.

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